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Walk from the City Centre canals to Edgbaston Reservoir

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This walk can be started fro any of the city centre canals – see the City Centre Canal Walk for more information - and takes a route along the Birmingham Canal Main Line for just under a mile then by road for under a mile to the canal reservoir in Rotton Park, where you can walk around the reservoir.

From Old Turn Junction walk west, in the direction marked “Wolverhampton” on the island signpost. You can walk on the north or south towpath but when you get to Vincent Street bridge you need to cross over to the south side to be on the side where we turn off down Rotton Park Street. In the photo below the turning into Rotton Park Street can be seen between the brick pillars.

Turn into Rotton Park Street
Turn into Rotton Park Street

The turning is also marked by this plaque.

Plaque
Plaque

Walk down Rotton Park Street to the end where it joins Ickield Port Road then cross the road and turn left up Ickield Port Road - and across the bridge over the Ickield Port Loop of the Canal and on to the junction with Ostler Street.

Ickield Port Loop
Ickield Port Loop

Go up Ostler Street until you come to the entrance to Rotton Park

Ostler Street
Ostler Street

Rotton Park Reservoir was opened in 1826 to improve the water supply to the increasingly busy Birmingham canals and was the largest expanse of water in Birmingham at the time. Its original depth was 40 feet (12 m) and it covers an area of 58 acres holding 300,million gallons of water.

Entrance to Rotton Park
Entrance to Rotton Park

Nearby in Waterworks Road is the gothic-style Perrott’s Folly built in 1758 which stands 30 metres high. It was Perrott’s viewing tower on his country estate. From 1884 it was used by Abraham Follet Osler as one of the world’s first weather stations. He invented the self-regulating wind gauge which he tested on this site. The building was rescued in 1958 when a successful public appeal was made for its repair and is now a Grade II* Listed building. As Birmingham’s only surviving folly this has been renovated and is regularly open to the public.

Rotton Park Reservior
Rotton Park Reservior

For a PDF version of this page click Print Route