Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
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Jim Shead's Waterways Information

An encyclopedia of the canals and rivers of England and Wales, including historical data, provided by Jim Shead, Waterways Writer and Photographer.

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www.jim-shead.com

Featured Pages

Birmingham Canal Museum Do we need one can we get one? Have a look and complete the survey to give your views. If you are organizing a UK canal or river event that you would like added to this list please let me know.

Today's Featured Waterway Photo

Old Royd Lock No 17 Lorna-Ann in
For more information see Rochdale Canal.

The Boat Listing is now hosted by CanalPlanAC. Please update your Favourites/Bookmarks to http://canalplan.org.uk/boats/

For more information about the Boat Listing see About the Boat Listing

If you are a newcomer to the subject, or this web site, you may want to start with my Introduction pages. These give an introduction to this website, the UK Waterways System, its history and to inland boating on canals or rivers.

Now it's easier to buy on-line when you

Enter the Waterways Shopping Center

Books, videos, DVDs and links to other canal shopping sites.

For non-waterway travel photographs see www.jim-shead.net

I am also webmaster for the following waterways sites Railway & Canal Historical Society
The Association of Nene River Clubs
House of York

All about the Inland Waterways Association (IWA) click here

Quote of the day No 213

Saturday 25 March 2017

In the 19th century the cabins became larger and better equipped as the crew, and then whole families, began to live on board. With the arrival of self-propulsion, the narrow boats were grouped into pairs, one of which was fitted with an engine. This towed the other, the butty, and together they could carry about 50 tons, crewed by two or three people, or one family. Until the Second World War, this was a cheap, reliable and practical form of inland transport, particularly over short distances and, although canals did suffer from railway competition, it was really the rapid development of motor transport from the 1930s onwards that killed them.

The tradition of family-based boating evolved a whole culture of its own, affecting social habits, language, dress and food, along with a wealth of decoration. The habit of living on a narrow boat for a lifetime produced characteristic ways of improving, and making more domestic, the basic environment of the boat and its cabin. These included particular ways with rope, and a range of cabin fittings whose intricacy matched those of a gypsy caravan. Best known, however, are the styles of painting, both in the treatment of wooden surfaces with graining and in the multi-coloured decorations that used typical peasant-like images of flowers, landscapes and castles, balanced by beautifully inventive sign writing. Also typical is the extensive use of highly polished brass.

Paul Atterbury - Exploring Britainís Canals

For more information about these daily quotations see About the Quote of the Day.

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Jim Shead Waterways Photographer & Writer
Text and photographs copyright of Jim Shead.
Home Introduction Waterways List Waterways Map Links Books DVD Articles Photo Gallery
Features Contact me Glossary Boats Events List History Local Waterways Help Photo List